Mathematician Michael Lacey, Academic and Career Life

Michael is a knowledgeable American mathematician with exceptional skills and long-service experience. Since 2001, Michael has worked at Georgia Institute of Technology, and now serves as a full professor in the institution. Michael attended the University of Texas from where he graduated with Bachelors of Science in 1981. He later enrolled at the University of Illinois for his master’s program.

While at the University of Illinois, Michael Lacey did a thesis on probability, Banach spaces under Walter Philipp’s supervision. He further concentrated his focus in solving empirical characteristic functions and laws related to iterated logarithm.

In 1987, Michael Lacey graduated with doctorate and first served at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. A year later, Michael later moved to work at University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In this institution, Michael worked together with Walter Philipp, his advisor. The two collaborated and later presented their mathematical proof of almost sure central limit theorem.

After a year of services at UNC, Michael transferred to Indiana University in Bloomberg when he consistently served for seven years. While working in this institution Michael persistently continued with his education, in 1990 he earned the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. During his fellowship, Michael studied Hilbert transform and solved this problem in 1996. This exemplary work earned him a Salem Prize together with his colleague.

In 1996, Michael Lacey joined Georgia Institute of Technology where he began his career. He first worked as an associate professor and was later given the title of a full professor. In 2004, Michael received a Guggenheim Fellowship while working at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Mike also joined the American Mathematician Society where he became a fellow. Michael has published several papers and proofs in mathematics throughout the better part of his career. Michael has earned high-end portfolio for his exceptional skills in math and its application.